Hair Loss Causes and Treatments

Health

by admin

Hair loss is a very common condition and affects most people at some time in their lives, and it can range from mild hair thinning to total baldness. Hair can fall out for many different reasons. The majority of men lose their hair not through stress, or bad diet, or lack of sleep, but through the genetic trait of male pattern baldness which is hard to treat through shampoos or supplements alone. Women lose their hair for other reasons, but the argument still stands that a lot of the hair loss products on the market are just offering false hope. That said, there are a few that really work.

We normally lose approximately 50 to 100 scalp hairs each day. If more than, you may find unusually large amounts of hair in brushes, on clothing, and in the drains of sinks and tubs. You may also notice that your hair is generally thinner. Because of hair thinning, your hairline has changed or that one or more bald patches have appeared.

When hair loss is the result of telogen effluvium or medication side effects, the hair loss usually is all over the head, while in tinea infections and alopecia areata, the hair loss occurs in small patches. Also, tinea infections can cause additional symptoms, such as scaling of the scalp or areas of broken hairs that look like black dots. In traumatic alopecia, the area of hair loss depends on the method of hair injury and follows the pattern inflicted by hot rollers, braiding or chemical treatments. In male-pattern baldness, the hairline usually begins to recede at the temples first, followed by thinning at the top of the head. Gradually, the crown area becomes totally bald, leaving a fringe of hair around the back and sides of the head.

Due to there are many types of hair loss, finding the cause can be challenging. Most hair loss is not associated with systemic or internal disease, nor is poor diet a frequent factor. Hair may simply thin as a result of predetermined genetic factors and the overall aging process. Many men and women may notice mild physiologic thinning of hair starting in their 30s and 40s. Life vicissitudes, including illness, emotional trauma, protein deprivation (during strict dieting), and hormonal changes like those in pregnancy, puberty, and menopause may cause hair loss.

Several health conditions, including thyroid disease, iron deficiency anemia, and secondary syphilis, can cause hair loss. While thyroid blood tests and other lab tests, including a complete blood count (CBC), on people who have ordinary hair loss are usually normal, it is important to exclude treatable causes of hair loss.

How long hair loss lasts depends on the cause. In telogen effluvium, for example, hair usually is lost over several weeks to months, but then grows back over the next several months. When hair loss is a side effect of a medication, hair regrowth usually returns to normal once the drug is stopped. If you are losing hair because of abusive hairdressing, the hair loss usually stops after you change to more natural styling, except in traction alopecia, which results from years of pulling the hair back in tight braids. In tinea scalp infection, the fungus that causes the problem must be treated for at least 6 to 12 weeks and hair regrowth may be slow. Early treatment is important in preventing possible permanent hair loss. Both male- and female-pattern baldness tend to get worse over time but can be treated.

In hair clubs, people often be recommended the relevant shampoo or make haircut for hair loss. And those who do seek medical help can be treated with topical minoxidil (Rogaine) or (in men only) oral finasteride (Propecia, Proscar), or they can choose hair transplants or scalp-reduction surgery.

                                                                                                                  Eileen Song